Enterprise Agreement To Csp

With Microsoft`s Cloud Solutions Provider (CSP) program, you pay a monthly fee only for the licenses and software you need, which becomes much more convenient and less expensive for large enterprises. To help you decide if you should switch to CSP, we`ve put together this handy EA vs CSP comparison chart that highlights the main differences between these two agreements. Over the years, Microsoft`s EA has been a popular solution for many companies. Its appeal lies in the fact that companies can grant their agreement by granting licenses. A Microsoft Enterprise (Microsoft EA) agreement was once the primary licensing vehicle for large organizations with more than 500 seats. However, the complex three-year deal, once so popular, is becoming obsolete. As cloud-based services like Azure and Office 365 become the norm, even large enterprises are changing the way they purchase products and services and are looking for a more flexible volume licensing option from Microsoft with the CSP program. A Microsoft EA allows companies to acquire cloud services and software licenses under a three-year contract. EAs are typically used by large enterprises that can manage at least more than 500 user licenses and need a fixed price for software and subscription licenses for 3 years. However, large companies continue to switch to CSP because it is more flexible and saves costs. Microsoft partners such as Ensono manage the customer relationship through support and management services.

Customers pay a predictable monthly bill through their partner, based on their exact use of Microsoft cloud services such as Azure and M365 and D365. The relationship is governed by Microsoft`s strong service level agreement, which defines the essential aspects of the service, such as quality and availability between the service provider and the customer. A company with 750 employees has partnered with another large company and is looking for ways to reduce costs across the organization. If they are currently bound by an EA, they are essentially stuck when they take stock of what is being used and find that a large part of their staff is not fully using what they are paying for. . . .