Armistice Agreement Line

1. The ceasefire demarcation lines for all sectors except the area currently held by Iraqi forces shall be described on the maps set out in point 3 of Annex I to this Agreement and shall be defined as follows: The United Nations has established monitoring and reporting agencies to monitor the established ceasefire lines. In addition, discussions on the implementation of the ceasefire led to the signing of the separate tripartite declaration of 1950 between the United States, Great Britain and France. In that document, they pledged to take measures inside and outside the United Nations to prevent violations of borders or ceasefire lines. He also explained their commitment to peace and stability in the region, their opposition to the use or threat of force and reaffirmed their opposition to the development of an arms race. These lines were maintained until the Six-Day War of 1967. On 25, 26 and 27 May, both sides filed complaints of violations of the comprehensive ceasefire agreement by civilians and military personnel in the Al-Dawayima area. At an emergency meeting of the Joint Ceasefire Commission, the two sides agreed on a joint investigation. UN observers accompanied the representatives to the demarcation line to establish the facts. Despite the previously agreed ceasefire, serious gunfire erupted during the investigation. Israeli troops had fired over the demarcation line on Jordanians into Jordanian territory in response to illegal border crossings by Jordanian peasants, and Israeli soldiers were suspected of burning crops on Jordanian territory. The origin of the incident was the illegal cultivation of land on Israeli territory by Jordanians. [Citation required] From their positions in the Golan Heights, Syrian forces fired on Israeli settlements in the demilitarized zone, attacked fishing boats on the Kinneret and fired on agricultural workers.

[28] The new military borders for Israel, as defined in the agreements, included about 78% of the Palestinian territory as it was established after the independence of Transjordan (now Jordan) in 1946. . . .